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From here you can access any of our Social Media platforms. Also, you can see our most recent posts below. We post a very diverse amount of things including videos, articles, and pictures.

How to Find a Reputable Diesel Engine Mechanic?

Diesel engines are different from gasoline and electric engines, not just in performance but also in maintenance and repairs. Consequently, you need to find a good mechanic familiar with this piece of machine known for its high torque, making it popular among people who need load and off-road trucks.  

Visit Choat Engineering Performance if you need diesel engine repair and maintenance. Aside from our state-of-the-art drive-in facility located in Tennessee, we also sell engines and parts and offer reverse engineering. 

 

How to find a good mechanic?

Here, we list the most important things you should look for when selecting a diesel engine mechanic. 

 

Right qualifications and certifications

Not all vehicle engines are created the same; this is especially true for diesel engine cars and trucks with higher torque, better fuel efficiency and more impressive acceleration than gasoline engines.

Because diesel engines are different from electric and gasoline engines, it’s important to find a mechanic who specializes in these engines. Consequently, you need to take into account their qualifications and certifications.

A good rule of thumb is to ask if they have certification from the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence after completing a special diesel engine repairing or serving program. 

 

Extensive experience 

Due to the complicated nature of diesel engine repair and maintenance, you should only work with a mechanic who has been doing it for several years. Thus, ask them if they can perform a total rewiring, what are the vehicle types they often deal with, and how long they have been in the industry. 

 

State-of-the-art shop 

To some extent, the mechanics are only as good as their tools when it comes to diesel engine repair, maintenance and reverse engineering. For this reason, at Choate Engineering Performance, we have invested heavily in our state-of-the-art drive-in facility in Tennessee. 

Thanks to our aggressive investment in technology, we now also provide our clients with high-quality diesel engines and parts and perform reverse engineering in which we reproduce another manufacturer’s product after conducting a detailed examination of its construction. 

 

Get some recommendations

Read online customer reviews, check out a drive-in facility’s star rating (you can do this by visiting Better Business Bureau) or ask your friends for recommendations.                   

 

What questions do you need to ask your diesel engine mechanic?

Before you bring in your vehicle or engine, you may want to ask a mechanic the following questions: 

  • How long have you been repairing and servicing diesel engines?
  • Do you or your shop provide a guaranty?
  • What types of diesel engine parts do you use? Second-hand, new, or do you make your own parts? (This is what separates Choate Engineering Performance from run-of-the-mill machine shops because we have invested heavily in technologies and equipment that allow us to do reverse engineering and make our own engine parts.)
  • What are the payment policies and the labor rates?
  • What’s the estimated time for repair or maintenance? 

 

Final word 

If you need reputable diesel engine mechanics, quality parts and engine products, or a state-of-the-art drive-in facility, please visit Choate Engineering Performance and request for a quote. You can also visit our repair and maintenance shop at 1033 Lake St. Bolivar, TN 380008 or call us at (901) 553-9847. 

Procharged 6.4L Powerstroke – An innovative diesel engine

Thanks to the 6.4L Powerstroke’s K16 high-pressure fuel pump, it can accommodate up to 20% more fuel flow than most diesel engines. Yet, despite this benefit, it remains one of the most hated engines in the market because of its susceptibility to failures and chafing on the fuel pump harness.

To solve this problem, Choate Engineering Performance has designed a hybrid that combines the best of both worlds: A diesel engine that incorporates the strong points of 6.4L and 6.0L. Read more about this innovative diesel engine in Engine Builder magazine. 

 

Procharged 6.4L Powerstroke and its hybrid components 

Choate Engineering Performance founder Cass Choate explained that this hybrid is an “interesting deal,” as it utilizes a 6.0L block bored over to 6.4L and combines four stages of nitrous, a 1964 F100 pickup and a Procharger. 

Instead of using an O ring setup, the diesel engine expert and his team decided to use a C ring for the cylinder heads to accommodate the thicker flange and the materials used for the fully sleeved block.  

Choate said the hybrid diesel engine also “uses a ductile iron sleeve with a Rockwell hardness of 98.6 that cuts way down into the water jacket.”

He added that they used a “very large sleeve with a wall thickness that’s around ⅛ inch, and a wider flange that’s about ¼ inch,” explaining that this diameter is one way to compensate for the C ring setup’s strain on the flanges on the sleeves.

Initially, Choate and his team could not find something that would work well with a 6.4L diameter piston in a 6.0L block until UEM helped them make custom pistons that the company later decided to coat.  

 

Performance of this hybrid diesel engine 

Thanks to the 6.0L cranks, the hybrid can withstand high horsepower, although the team is still finding ways to improve the block’s performance further. 

 

The issue that spurred the Hybrid 6.4L Powerstroke’s design 

Choate said the airflow issue was the main thing that spurred the creation of the hybrid engine. 

“We unshroud the valves to increase a little bit more airflow and get some of the air restriction off the initial valve opening. This was the reason for the larger displacement,” he explained further. 

Meanwhile, the team expects the engine to churn out 2,000 horsepower for its drag truck application, which is made possible with the addition of Procharger and the four stages of nitrous.

 

Final word 

At Choate Engineering Performance, we are a team of diesel engine experts who provide a wide range of repair and maintenance services while at the same time offering short blocks, long blocks, full runner engines and reverse engineering. 

 

Services we offer: 

  • Truck shipping 
  • Diagnosis 
  • Cab off 
  • Fleet maintenance
  • Fuel system diagnostics
  • Turbo installation 
  • Fass systems
  • Engine installation
  • Suspension work
  • Scheduled maintenance
  • Lift kits

 

Our engines and parts: 

  • Cylinder heads
  • Gasket and seals
  • Engines
  • Parts, 
  • Pistons 
  • Short and long blocks
  • Custom-built engines 
  • Reverse engineering

 

Visit Choate Engineering Performance to learn more about diesel engines and parts, repairs and maintenance services, and reverse engineering. You can also call us at (901) 553-9847. We’re excited to hear from you soon. 

A Guide to Different Engine Types

A vehicle can have the fanciest features, but its engine is the thing that truly defines it. For this reason, it’s not surprising that many truck and car enthusiasts prefer internal combustion engines to external combustion models. If you need diesel engine parts, maintenance and repairs, visit Choate Performance or call us at (901) 553-9847.

 

How do internal combustion engines work? 

This engine, which consists of a fixed cylinder and a moving piston, works by expanding combustion gasses that push the piston, causing the crankshaft to rotate and the entire system of gears to drive the vehicle’s wheels. 

What makes them different?

Since the fuel burns directly in the cylinder of internal combustion engines, they are more energy efficient than external combustion engines. Also, they experience a smaller heat loss and a higher thermal efficiency. 

Other benefits of internal combustion engines: 

  • Their starting time is significantly shorter compared to external combustion engines
  • Their smaller size makes them ideal for small power requirement applications
  • Safer to operate 

 

Diesel engines

There are two basic types of internal combustion engines that are currently in production: the compression ignition diesel engine and the spark ignition gasoline engine. While they use different fuel types and operate using different cycles, they mostly come with four-piston strokes. 

Meanwhile, a diesel engine works by compressing air to high pressure and temperature, followed by injecting it with a small amount of fuel. The extreme temperature then causes the injected fuel to evaporate, which makes it 30-50% more energy efficient than gas engines. 

And since there is no spark as the fuel auto-ignites, diesel engines are more rugged and reliable, plus they require lower maintenance costs than gas engines. 

 

Inline or straight engine

This engine, which also falls under the category of internal combustion engines, comes with all its cylinders aligned in one row (which means having no offset) that appears like a straight line, which explains its name. 

 

Wankel or rotary engine

Another type of internal combustion engine, the Wankel engine converts pressure into a rotating motion. As a result, it has a more uniform torque, more power (it packs a punch considering its size) and less vibration compared to other engine types. 

In 1954, a German engineer named Felix Heinrich designed the Wankel engine with a specific purpose in mind: Create a new engine that wouldn’t have the same amount of vibrations as a piston engine. 

 

Boxer Engine

When you look at a boxer engine, it stays true to its name–it has a boxy and flat appearance. Meanwhile, half of its pistons move in the opposite direction and away from the crank simultaneously, giving it a smoother operation. This is also lighter because there is no need to use a counterbalance since the engine creates its own balancing effect. 

 

Final word

No matter what type of engine your vehicle uses, you need to keep up with the regular maintenance schedule (also called preventative maintenance) to extend its life, reduce wear and tear, and prevent costly repairs in the future. 

If you’re looking for a hands-on solution to your diesel machine shop frustrations, visit Choate Performance Engineering Performance where you can also get a quote for our quality products and services that have made us one of the leading diesel engine shops in the country. 

68RFE Failures Can Be Prevented

Everyone hates the feeling of being stranded because your truck won’t start. The stress and inconvenience can be overwhelming. It doesn’t have to be that way, though. If you know what to look for and how to avoid common transmission problems, your chances of seeing the red light go on are greatly improved. 68RFE Failures can be prevented, read on.

If you own a Dodge Cummins equipped with the 68RFE automatic transmission, there’s something you need to know. A fair number of these trucks have been plagued by the early failure of their transmission due to a design flaw that causes the torque converter lock-up clutch (TCC lockup) to fail at an accelerated rate. This article explains why this is so, how it affects your truck, and what you can do about it.

 

What is the 68RFE transmission and why is it so prone to failure?

The 68RFE transmission is a 6-speed automatic transmission developed jointly by Ford and General Motors for use in their heavy duty trucks, vans, and SUVs. In addition to the Fords and GMs, it was also used in Ram trucks for several years. Ford used the 68RFE in its Super Duty and Super Truck lines from 2005 to 2017.

In that time, it was involved in a number of transmission problems that are currently the subject of a class action lawsuit. Because the 68RFE transmission uses a clutch-type torque converter, it is especially vulnerable to damage from contaminated fluid. Ford made provisions in later years to clean the transmission fluid more thoroughly but, unfortunately, the damage had already been done.

A great many of these transmissions succumbed to internal failure early in their lives and have been a source of frustration ever since.

3 Common Symptoms of a Failing TCC Lock-Up Clutch

– Hard Shifts – Soft Shifts – Transmission Slipping

 

How to Detect a 68RFE Transmission Failure Before it Shuts Down

The transmission warning light will come on and stay on as the transmission fails. It will start to flash at some point as the transmission nears its shut down. You’ll know it’s time to get it fixed. For those who rely on their gauges to tell them what’s going on inside their transmission, the TCC lock-up clutch failure will result in two things – a drop in transmission temperature and a rise in transmission oil temperature. The drop in transmission temperature can be attributed to the fact that the TCC lock-up clutch is no longer aiding in the cooling of the transmission.

The rise in transmission oil temperature can be attributed to the fact that there is less oil flow due to the same problem.

 

What you can do to prevent transmission failure

All transmissions, regardless of make or model, will eventually fail due to wear and tear. There’s no way to avoid that. Preventing premature transmission failure, though, is something that can be done. The following steps can help keep your transmission in top condition.

  • Keep It Clean – Transmission fluid is designed to attract and hold dirt. If it’s allowed to become contaminated, that dirt can end up inside the transmission where it will do some serious damage. Cleaning your transmission every 25,000 miles is a good idea.
  • Change the Transmission Fluid – Once you’ve cleaned the transmission, change the fluid as well. This will help keep the dirt out of the transmission and help extend its life.
  • Make Sure the Right Oil is Being Used – Using the wrong type of oil in your transmission can cause premature failure just as easily as dirt can. Make sure you are using the recommended type and quantity of fluid in your transmission.

Conclusion

The 68RFE transmission is a 6-speed automatic transmission developed jointly by Ford and General Motors for use in their heavy-duty trucks, vans, and SUVs.

In addition to the Fords and GMs, the 68RFE was also used in Ram trucks for several years. Ford used the 68RFE in its Super Duty and Super Truck lines from 2005 to 2017. At that time, it was involved in a number of transmission problems that are currently the subject of a class-action lawsuit. Because the 68RFE transmission uses a clutch-type torque converter, it is especially vulnerable to damage from contaminated fluid, particularly in the first 100,000 miles.

 

Contact us if you want to learn even more!

Available for the Dodge 2007.5 and up

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Can I Resurface a 7.3 For Powerstroke Head?

The 7.3L Power Stroke engine is often overlooked when considering which engine makes the most sense for a pickup truck. However, with more than 350 hp and nearly 500 lb-ft of torque, the 7.3 is a compact powerhouse that can handle just about anything you throw at it – including a 6.7L Ford PowerStroke upgrade kit. However, even though the 7.3 and 6.7 are both from the same family of engines, there’s not as much aftermarket support for the Cummins engine as there is with other popular configurations like the 5.9 and 6.6L Duratorq engines used in Dodge Rams or Chevrolet Silverados. This article will explore everything that you need to know about upgrading a 7.3L to accept a lower-end V8 PowerStroke diesel swap kit and make the conversion yourself if you’re not fortunate enough to have an auto shop nearby that offers these services on a regular basis.

The Pros and Cons of a 7.3L Power Stroke Swap

One of the best benefits of upgrading your engine to a lower-end PowerStroke engine is that you’ll gain a significant amount of torque with minimal changes to your driving habits. The 7.3L engine has a long history of being used in commercial applications and excels at hauling heavy loads up steep inclines or pulling large boats or trailers. The added torque can also be helpful if you regularly tow heavy loads as you’ll have an easier time getting your trailer into motion from a standing stop. The primary disadvantage associated with a 7.3L Power Stroke engine swap is that it’s not as common as the lower-end 6.6L swap for an automatic transmission. It’s also more difficult to find someone who has experience with the 7.3L engine than the 6.6L because a greater number of shops specialize in the latter configuration.

Where do 7.3 powerstroke head gaskets fail?

The most common signs of a failing 7.3 Power Stroke head gasket are excessive blue smoke emissions and a rough idle. Depending on the severity of your gasket issues, you may also notice a drop in fuel economy and a drop in engine power. If you suspect that your head gasket is the root cause of these issues, you have 2 options: replace the gasket or convert your engine to a lower-end 6.6 Power Stroke swap kit. Both options are relatively inexpensive – but the conversion requires significantly less labor than replacing the gasket.

How to drain the heads powerstroke 7.3?

Before you start pulling apart the engine and removing the valve covers, you need to drain the engine oil and coolant. The best way to do this is to open the drain plug on the bottom of the engine and let all of the fluids drain into a suitable container. The next step is to remove the valve covers. There are a few different ways to do this, but the most common is to use a plastic scraper to remove the gasket and then pry the valve covers off with a set of pry bars. Once the valve covers are off, you can remove the pushrods and rocker arms. After that, you can remove the camshafts and crank and then remove the head bolts. Once the heads are off, you can also remove the intake manifold and fuel injectors if you plan to replace the head gaskets.

 

How to get 7.3 powerstroke heads to flow better?

To get your 7.3 Power Stroke heads to flow better, you can either machine the heads and the valves or buy aftermarket heads. If you want to perform a valve job on the heads, you need to remove the valves, remove the guides, and clean the surface of the heads. After that, you can use a valve grinding tool to adjust the valve angles and reshape the valve seats. If you want to buy aftermarket heads, you can use a 7.3 Power Stroke head flow chart to select the best option for your application. Aftermarket heads offer a significant performance advantage over stock heads, and they’re usually easier to install than a valve job.

Conclusion

The 7.3L Power Stroke engine is often overlooked when considering which engine makes the most sense for a pickup truck. However, with more than 350 hp and nearly 500 lb-ft of torque, the 7.3 is a compact powerhouse that can handle just about anything you throw at it – including a 6.7L Ford PowerStroke upgrade kit. The 7.3L engine swap has a long history of being used in commercial applications and excels at hauling heavy loads up steep inclines or pulling large boats or trailers. The added torque can also be helpful if you regularly tow heavy loads as you’ll have an easier time getting your trailer into motion from a standing stop.

Which engine should I buy and why?

There are a number of factors to consider when choosing an engine. Performance, fuel economy and ease of service are just some of the considerations you need to make when choosing which engine is right for you. In this article we’ll be taking a look at the most popular engine options available to buyers of new cars today, what each one offers and why one might suit your needs better than another. There are two main types of engines used in modern cars: internal combustion engines and electric motors. Both have pros and cons, and each has its uses in different types of cars. Let’s take a closer look at Which engine should I buy and why?

Workhorse engine or daily driver?

A workhorse engine is typically one that has a longer lifespan than a daily driver. This means that the parts have a higher durability which leads to lower maintenance and an extended life. A daily driver is an engine built for a vehicle that runs on a daily basis. This requires an engine that can endure the rigors of daily life without needing to be maintained as frequently.

What makes a daily driver and workhorse more reliable than a stock engine?

The parts in a daily driver and workhorse are often higher quality than the stock engine parts. The reason is that each part may be made to withstand more than what it is designed to do. One example of this is that a crankshaft may be made thicker and stronger than what’s needed in a stock engine. This thicker crankshaft can withstand more torque and force than the stock crankshaft.

 

What ad-ons do I need to add for more longevity and reliability?

For an added longevity and greater reliability, you’ll want to add some additional parts to your new engine. There are a few things you can add to help your engine last longer than a stock engine would.

  • Forged pistons: Forged pistons are stronger and more durable than cast pistons. They’re also lighter than cast pistons which means less friction and added performance.
  • Forged connecting rods: Forged connecting rods are stronger and more durable than cast connecting rods. They’re also lighter which leads to less friction and added performance.
  • Forged crankshaft: Forged crankshafts are stronger and more durable than cast crankshafts. They’re also lighter than cast crankshafts which leads to less friction and added performance.

What Choate offers for your engine

Choate offers a plethora of engine options that are designed to give you the most out of your engine. They offer high-performance, high-output and racing engines.

  • High-performance engines: These engines are designed to give you high-quality results while keeping costs low. They’re equipped with forged pistons, forged connecting rods and a forged crankshaft.
  • High-output engines: These engines have been built and designed to provide you with more power and potential than a standard engine. They’re equipped with forged pistons, forged connecting rods and a forged crankshaft.
  • Racing engines: These engines have been built and designed to provide you with the highest amount of power and potential. They’re built with forged pistons, forged connecting rods, and forged or billet crankshafts.

Summary

Choate has been in business since 1931 and has been assisting customers with their engine needs ever since. Choate provides top-of-the-line engines for a variety of vehicles including Toyota, Nissan, Land Rover, Ford, Chevrolet and more. Choate’s engines are built with high-quality parts, which results in greater reliability. Choate also offers a wide range of engine options to suit your needs, whether you’re looking for a high-performance engine or a racing engine.

 

Choate has been in business since 1931 and has been assisting customers with their engine needs ever since. Choate provides top-of-the-line engines for a variety of vehicles including Toyota, Nissan, Land Rover, Ford, Chevrolet and more. Choate’s engines are built with high-quality parts, which results in greater reliability. Choate also offers a wide range of engine options to suit your needs, whether you’re looking for a high-performance engine or a racing engine.

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